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The University of Manitoba campuses are located on original lands of Anishinaabeg, Cree, Ojibwe-Cree, Dakota, and Dene peoples, and on the National Homeland of the Red River Métis. More

Indigenous Science: Home

Image credit: “Ojibwe Giizhig Anung Masinaaigan - Ojibwe Sky Star Map”, a Native Skywatchers star map created by A. Lee, W. Wilson, C. Gawboy, ©2012




Image credit: The Ojibwe sky star map, also known as the 'Ojibwe giizhig anung masinaaigan' is a Native Skywatchers map created by A. Lee, W. Wilson, C. Gawboy (image courtesy of A. Lee, W. Wilson and C. Gawboy)




Image credit: “Makoċe Wiċaŋḣpi Wowapi - D(L)akota Star Map”, a Native Skywatchers star map created by A. Lee, J. Rock, ©2012

Indigenous Science

For millennia, humans have stared into the night sky and wondered...The Ininew (Cree) of Mikinahk Ministik (Turtle Island) hold sacred the many Tellings and Teachings in the various constellations in Ininew Cosmology reveal....The first thing we should be aware of is that every culture on Nikawiy Aski has an intellectual capacity, a distinctive depth of knowledge, a philosophy and world view parallel to and as valid as any scientific theory and philosophy put forward by the most learning-edge thinkers to date.

—Pawaminikititicikiw (the Dream Keeper) AKA Wilfred Buck, Kitchikisik (Great Sky) Tellings that fill the Night Sky, illustrated by Mistawais Buck. Indigenous Education Press, 2021.

How to Find Resources

The University of Manitoba Libraries recognizes that our catalogue and resource descriptions contain language that reflects the biases, norms, and perspectives of the time in which they were created. In particular, for resources about persons and groups, this language is often outdated and harmful. These descriptions also incorporate controlled vocabularies, such as the Library of Congress Subject Headings, which include some headings that are offensive or inappropriate. We use international standards for description, but support and actively participate in efforts to update and change these practices as we strive for descriptions that are inclusive, respectful, and do not cause harm. We acknowledge the critical importance of community consultation in these efforts, and as residents on Treaty 1 territory on original lands of the Anishinaabeg, Cree, Oji-Cree, Dakota, and Dene peoples, and on the homeland of the Métis Nation, we commit to working together with our local communities to make these changes.

If you encounter language in the University of Manitoba Libraries' catalogue records or other resource descriptions that you find offensive or harmful, or if you have questions about this statement or our work, we welcome your feedback via acqdaf@umanitoba.ca. We are committed to reviewing and adding to catalogue records and other resource descriptions as appropriate, where we can.

If at any time you feel the need to speak with someone, a national crisis line is available for Residential School Survivors and their families 24 hours a day, seven days a week: 1-866-925-4419. In addition, the University of Manitoba’s Indigenous Student Centre has a dedicated Student Counsellor. You can book a session by contacting the Indigenous Student Centre at (204)474-8850 or emailing isc@umanitoba.ca.

Finding materials related to Indigenous science can be challenging due to inconsistencies in the language used to catalogue library resources. Terms such as "Indigenous," "Aboriginal," and "First Nations," as well as outdated colonial language are used and applied to literature originating from various historical and cultural contexts.

Consequently, it is important to apply a range of terms when searching to gain an understanding of how using these search terms produces different results. Below are some search terms related to Indigenous education. Click on any of the examples under Subject headings and search terms to see a list of results in the catalogue.

Selected Books

Need Help?

Contact Justin Fuhr or another Science Librarian with any questions or for help with library services.

Selected UM Indigenous Science Researchers

Anisinaabe from Lake St. Martin

Assistant Professor and Indigenous Scholar

Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science

Faculty profile

Research: Water quality and food security relating to livelihoods and sustenance challenges in the twenty-first century for First Nations.

Anisinaabe from Ontario

Assistant Professor and Indigenous Scholar

Department of Entomology, Faculty of Agriculture & Food Sciences

Faculty profile

Research: Entomology; beneficial insect ecology in agro-ecosystems and the greater landscape.

Otipemisiwak -- Metis Nation of Alberta, Region 6

Assistant Professor and Indigenous Scholar

Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science

Faculty profile

Research: Microbial ecology, especially plant-fungal interactions in wetlands; mycology, comparative plant anatomy (paleobotany).

Aboriginal

Assistant Professor

Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Science

Faculty profile

Research: Theoretical sub-atomic and nuclear physics.

Montubio from Ecuador

Assistant Professor and Indigenous Scholar

Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science

Faculty profile

Research: environmental microbiomes in different impacted aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems; water quality and microbial source tracking; changes in microbial community as direct discharges from wastewater treatment plants or concentrated animal feeding operations; antibiotic resistance genes.

Indigenous Science Examples at U of M

External Resources

The University of Manitoba campuses are located on original lands of Anishinaabeg, Cree, Oji-Cree, Dakota and Dene peoples, and on the homeland of the Métis Nation. We respect the Treaties that were made on these territories, we acknowledge the harms and mistakes of the past, and we dedicate ourselves to move forward in partnership with Indigenous communities in a spirit of reconciliation and collaboration.