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The University of Manitoba campuses are located on original lands of Anishinaabeg, Cree, Oji-Cree, Dakota, and Dene peoples, and on the homeland of the Métis Nation. More

Legal Research + Writing: Finding Case Law

CanLII is a free-to-use legal resources retrieval database.Use it to access case law and legislation from every jurisdiction in Canada. CanLII also publishes up-to-date board and tribunal decisions from across the country.
 

Lexis Advance Quicklaw is a pay-to-use legal research database that provides users with access to case law (Canadian and international jurisprudence), legislative materials and academic commentary, among others. Lexis Advance Quicklaw is the exclusive online publisher of Halsbury's Laws of Canada.

(Robson Hall students, faculty and library staff can access Lexis Advance Quicklaw by clicking on the image above)
 

WestlawNext Canada is another pay-to-use legal research database. Users are granted access to case law (Canadian and international jurisprudence), legislative materials and academic commentary. WestlawNext Canada also provides electronic access to the Canadian Encyclopedic Digest (CED) and the Index to Canadian Legal Literature.

(Robson Hall students, faculty and library staff can access WestlawNext Canada by clicking on the image above)

Case Reporters - Books that contain judicial decisions from a variety of courts and jurisdictions. Reporters remain the best resource for retrieving jurisprudence in print. Titles available at the E.K. Williams Law Library include:

The Supreme Court Reports

The Federal Court Reports

Dominion Law Reports

Western Weekly Reports

Canadian Criminal Cases

Manitoba Reports
 

Legal Encyclopedias - A great resource to find case law, especially by topic or subject matter. The E.K. Williams Law Library provides access to both the Canadian Encyclopedic Digest (CED) and Halsbury's Laws of Canada in print.
 

Words and Phrases - Using a Words and Phrases service can help identify case law that has interpreted or defined a particular legal term.

Noting Up Case Law

"Noting Up" a case simply means confirming whether the decision is currently valid: Has the decision be overturned on appeal? Has it been criticized or overruled in subsequent decisions? Is it now viewed as a precedent-setting case?

The other purpose of noting up is to locate subsequent cases that have judicially considered that case. Depending on whether or not the decision was followed, subsequent cases could be sourced to support your position.

Noting up using KeyCite in WestlawNext Canada:
PDF version can be found here.


Noting up using QuickCite in LexisAdvance Quicklaw:
PDF version can be found here.

Liaison Librarian

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Matthew Renaud
Contact:
E.K. Williams Law Library
(204) 474-6371
Subjects: Law