Skip to Main Content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.
The University of Manitoba campuses are located on original lands of Anishinaabeg, Cree, Oji-Cree, Dakota, and Dene peoples, and on the homeland of the M├ętis Nation. More

Government Publications: Citing

A guide to publications from municipal, provincial, federal, national, and international government agencies.

Statutes

Statutes are published at the end of each parliamentary session.  Every so often, all of the sessional volumes are pulled together, along with all existing statutes, into one complete set of statutes in alphabetical order, called the Revised Statutes.

The Statutes of Canada were last revised in 1985.  Statutes in effect at that time will thus be cited as RSC 1985, for the Revised Statutes of Canada, 1985.  The chapter number of the statute includes the initial letter of the name of the act.

Examples:  Criminal Code, RSC 1985, c. C - 46.      
                  Privacy Act, RSC 1985, c. P- 21.

Federal statutes passed after 1985 are cited as SC for the Statutes of Canada. In this case, chapters are indicated by numbers only, with no initial letters.

Examples Youth Criminal Justice Act, SC 2002. c. 1. 
                  Nunavut Act, SC 1993, c. 28.

If citing a specific section or subsection of an act, add the section/subsection numbers at the end of the citation.

Example:  Youth Criminal Justice Act, SC 2002. c. 1, s. 38(2).

Bills

When citing bills, include the bill number, the title of the bill, the session of Parliament, the number of the Parliament, and the year.   

Example
              Bill C-27, An Act to Amend the Canadian Human Rights Act, 2nd Session, 39th Parliament, 2007.

When citing provincial bills, include the jurisdiction.

Example:
              
Bill 3, The Public Service Act,
3rd Session, 42nd Parliament, Manitoba, 2020.

Regulations

Federal regulations were last consolidated in 1978.  Regulations in effect in 1978 are cited to the Consolidated Regulations of Canada (CRC).

Example
     Air Cushion Vehicle RegulationsCRC, c. 4

After 1978, federal regulations are cited by the year and number.

Example
    Trade-marks Regulations (1996), SOR/96-195

SOR stands for Statutory Orders and Regulations, 96 is the year and 195 is the number of the regulation.

Provincial Regulations are also cited by year and number, but include the jurisdiction.  In the following example, 74 is the year and 181 is the number of the regulation.

Example:  BC Reg 181/74

In-Text Citations

You should also cite the section and subsection(s) of statutes, bills, and regulations.

Statutes:

Apology Act, SBC 2006, c 19.

(Apology Act, 2006)

Nunavut Act, SC 1993, c 28.

(Nunavut Act, 1993)

Bills:

Bill C-27, An Act to Amend the Canadian Human Rights Act, 2nd Session, 39th Parliament, 2007.

(Bill C-27, 2007)

Bill 3, The Public Service Act3rd Session, 42nd Parliament, Manitoba, 2020.

(Bill 3, 2020)

Regulations:

Trade-marks Regulations (1996), SOR/96-195.

(Trade-marks Reg, 1996)