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The University of Manitoba campuses are located on original lands of Anishinaabeg, Cree, Oji-Cree, Dakota, and Dene peoples, and on the homeland of the Métis Nation. More

Prairie Immigration Experience: W.C. Murray fonds

 

Click here to view the digitized archival material

Institution: University of Saskatchewan Archives

Collection Identifier: MG 1

Title: W.C. Murray fonds

Dates: 1900-1937 [1929-1933, predominant]

Extent: 4.3 m of textual records and photographs

Biographical Sketch: Walter Charles Murray was born 12 May 1866 in Studholm parish, King's county, New Brunswick. He started his academic career at the University of New Brunswick, receiving a BA in 1886. After earning a grammar school license at the provincial Normal School, Murray went to University of Edinburgh and received a MA in philosophy in 1891. After a brief period of study in Berlin, Murray returned to UNB as Professor of Philosophy and Economics. From 1892 to 1908, he was Munro Professor of Philosophy and lecturer in Education at Dalhousie University. During this time Murray married Christine Cameron and they subsequently had three daughters. In 1908 he was appointed the University of Saskatchewan's first President, a position he held until his retirement in 1937. In conjunction with his duties at the University of Saskatchewan, Murray served on a number of commissions, boards and councils. Upon his retirement he was named President Emeritus and remained active in the local community until his death in March 1945.

Digitized Material: The digitized material from the W.C. Murray fonds consists of correspondence, notes, reports, photos, maps, evidence and lists pertaining to Dr. Murray's activities on three royal commissions and as a judge of the Community Progress Competitions. These Competitions were conceived by the Colonization Department of the C.N.R. to ascertain what contributions people of Continental European origin had made to community life in certain districts, and to what extent they stimulated further community progress and development. The records contain the assessments of the judges on community life on the districts that entered the competition.

For a full description of the W.C. Murray fonds search the databases of Archives Canada and the Saskatchewan Archival Information Network (SAIN).

 

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