Skip to Main Content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.
The University of Manitoba campuses are located on original lands of Anishinaabeg, Cree, Oji-Cree, Dakota, and Dene peoples, and on the homeland of the Métis Nation. More

The Essentialists Exhibition: Jennie Lau

Artwork Gallery

Digital drawing of bamboo trees and chopsticks being hauled to landfill
Animated bamboo chopsticks in landfill

Artist Statement

Artist Name: Jennie Lau

Title: Neo-Bamboo Forest

Medium: Digital collage and drawing, Photoshop, photo images, cell phone

Size/Dimension: 3600 (H) x 4800 (W) pixels

Year: 2020

 

Artist Statement:

Bamboo chopsticks are closely associated with daily life around the globe. They are a very popular dining tool, convenient and disposable. We think they are eco-friendly and recyclable, but they are not — they go to the landfill, and make a significant impact on our environment. 

Neo-Bamboo Forest is a digital artwork that cycles disposable bamboo chopsticks through their original landscape of a fast-growing forest to the newly manmade landscape of the Anthropocene — a landfill. My intent with this piece is to alert people of the consequences for our environment whenever we dispose of a single pair. Can we better utilize chopsticks, reduce their disposal rate, and change our lifestyle? The digital process of integrating bamboo chopsticks into the bamboo forest emphasizes human intervention with nature. My process of adding multi-layers of paper echoes our disposal practice and constant damage to our precious land. For me, the digital drawing effect conveys one of the many vicissitudes of the Anthropocene.​