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Citing Alternate Formats - Chicago Style

Books

The examples below show how to cite books. However, the first/last name appearance of authors, which is dependent upon the number of authors follows the same pattern in citations for any type of material.

For books accessed in E-versions, scroll down.

[14.100 - books]
[14.72 - authors]

One author

Note:       #. Author First-name Last-name, Title of book (Place of Publication: Publisher, Year), page numbers.
       1. Katelijne Schiltz, Music and Riddle Culture in the Renaissance (Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press, 2015), 65-68.
Subsequent notes, same title:      #. Author Last-name, Shortened title of book, pg number.
       2. Schiltz, Music and Riddle Culture, 66.
Bibliography:

Author Last-name, First-name. Title of book. Place of Publication: Publisher, Year.

 

Schiltz, Katelijne. Music and Riddle Culture in the Renaissance. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2016.

Two Authors

Note:       #. Author1 First-name Last-name and Author2 First-name Last-name, Title of book (Place of Publication: Publisher, Year), page numbers.
       1. Kate Bowan and Paul A. Pickering, Sounds of Liberty: Music, Radicalism and Reform in the Anglophone world, 1790-1914  (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2017), 230-31.
Subsequent notes:      2. Bowan and Pickering, Sounds of Liberty, 255.
Bibliography:

Author1 Last-Name, First-Name and Author2 First-Name Last-Name. Title of book. Place of Publication: Publisher, Year.

 

Brooks, Daniel R., and Deborah A. McLennan. The Nature of Diversity: An Evolutionary Voyage of Discovery. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2002.

Naming more than two authors

When citing more than two authors, use commas between each name, with and preceding the final name. List all authors up to 10. When more than 10: list 7 authors separated by commas, followed by et al. then proceed citation as applicable. 

Note:       #. Author1 First-Name Last-Name, Author2 First-Name Last-Name, Author3 First-Name Last-Name and Author4 First-Name Last-Name...
Bib:

Author1 Last-Name, First-Name, Author2 First-Name Last-Name, Author3 First-Name Last-Name and Author4 First-Name Last-Name...

Chapter or essay in a book

Note:

     #. Article/Chapter Author First-Name Last-Name, "Chapter Title," in Title of Book, ed. Editor First-Name Last-Name (Place of Publication: Publisher, Year), page numbers.

 

     1. Charlie Gillet, "Five Styles of Rock & Roll," in The Penguin Book of Rock & Roll Writing, ed. Clinton Heylin (London: Viking, 1992), 6-22.

Subsequent note:      2. Gillet, "Five Styles of Rock & Roll," 11.
Bib:  

Article/Chapter Author Last-Name, First-Name. "Chapter Title." In Title of Book, edited by Editor First-Name Last-Name, page numbers. Place of Publication: Publisher, Year.

 

Gillet, Charlie. "Five Styles of Rock & Roll," in The Penguin Book of Rock & Roll Writing, edited by Clinton Heylin, 6-22. London: Viking, 1992.

E-books  

Books consulted online:
Include a URL or, if accessed through a password-controlled library database, a DOI. If a DOI is not available, include the name of the database. [14.11, 14.161]

Access Dates:
Chicago does not require access dates in its citations of electronic sources unless no date of publication can be determined from the source. However, students may be required by their instructors to include access dates in their papers. If so, the access date should immediately precede the URL or name of the database. [14.12]

Page numbers:
In e-books these may vary depending on the application or device used and will only be helpful to those who consult the same e-book format. In such cases, it is best to cite a chapter number or section heading in lieu of a page number. (see first Note example below) [14.160]

Note:      #. Author First-name Last-name, Title of work (Place of Publication: Publisher, Year), page/chapter/section, date of access (see note above), DOI or name of database.
       1. Paul R. Laird, Leonard Bernstein: A Guide to Research (New York: Routledge, 2002), chap. 5, General Biographies, EBSCOhost.
       2. Sandra Garrido, Why are we Attracted to Sad Music? (Milperra, Australia: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017), chap. 4, accessed November 22, 2017, https://doi-org.uml.idm.oclc.org/10.1007/978-3-319-39666-8_4.
Subsequent note:      3. Garrido, Why are we Attracted to Sad Music?, chap. 4.
Bib: 

Author Last-Name, First-name. Title of work. Place of Publication: Publisher, Year. Database name or DOI.

 

Laird, Paul R. Leonard Bernstein: A Guide to Research. New York: Routeledge, 2002. EBSCOhost.

 

Garrido, Sandra. Why are we attracted to Sad music? Milperra, Australia: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017. Chapter 4. Accessed November 22, 2017. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-39666-8.