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The University of Manitoba campuses are located on original lands of Anishinaabeg, Cree, Oji-Cree, Dakota, and Dene peoples, and on the homeland of the M├ętis Nation. More

COVID Pedagogies: Tools, Content & Strategies

Jeanie Lui REP

Jeanie Lui

Video still of person in front of digital background with rainbow wings

Children learn from the sensory and motor stimuli, which trigger the right brain hemisphere. The learning is best through the creative arts. Psychologists found the cognitive processes between the left and right brain hemispheres of autism children are more symmetry. Art expression is especially helpful for them in improving self-esteem, self-awareness and thinking symbolically. With one in sixty-six children and teens diagnosed with the autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Funding and therapy offered by the Federal are insufficient. Because of the pandemic, the Ontario government postponed the launch of the new autism program to March 2021. The new program cannot reach out to all families who are waiting for the art therapy. The NGO plays a significant role to raise public awareness, offer resources and support. The series of virtual workshop targets the ASD kids of age six to seven. The storyteller leads the kids to experience a short adventure journey. It is an interactive play related to “The Wings”. Some craft kits of making fabric wings to be designed for parents or caretakers. The play triggers the right brain activity with sensory and motor stimuli. It leads them to imagine and create happy thoughts. Each workshop has a storyboard. The first introductory workshop guides the kids to see what is at the nature, inspired by Dr. Maria Montessori. Kids observe the surrounding natural environment and learn from it.